Frequently Asked Questions

I have a 4WD and I already have upgraded suspension - how do I get a GVM upgrade?

Simply contact us directly and we can carry out an inspection and test your vehicle. We submit the completed report to the vehicle standards office (the regulator here in the NT), they approve it and you have a final inspection at an MVR test shed. The whole process can take as short as 1 week.

I have a trailer (caravan, boat, box or other...) and I'd like to know if I can have the ATM upgraded

This can be a tricky one, but there are a few things you can check first before contacting us:

  1. See if the Compliance Plate states a different GTM or maximum axle group rating which is higher than your current ATM - this is usually a pretty good sign that you can have an upgrade with no physical change to the trailer.

  2. See if the trailer chassis has a separate plate showing a manufacturer and a GTM value - if this value is higher than your current GVM then it's pretty likely you can have an upgrade with no physical change to the trailer.

Either way, once you have thoroughly checked over your trailer, give us a call and we can find out what is necessary in your specific case.​

How long does it take to have a vehicle change approved?

The answer is - it depends!
Some people are super organised, have done all of their research beforehand, and their modification approval is very smooth (sometimes just a single week). Others can spend years on a hobby project enjoying every step of the process. We serve both types of clients and everyone in between.

I have a weird and wonderful idea and want to know if it's possible - what should I do?

Call Daly, he loves to have a chat about all weird and wonderful ideas. In a few short minutes he can tell you if:​

  • You're dreaming...

  • It might be possible; or

  • Yes, simple and straightforward - we've done it before

I have a 4WD and I'd like to upgrade the GCM -  is this possible?

Unfortunately, no, there is legislation in the Northern Territory which states that only the original vehicle manufacturer can change the GCM of a vehicle. Note this only applies to light vehicles (under 4.5T GVM).
There is a caveat to this, vehicles that don't have a specified GCM from the manufacturer retain their original towing capacity with a GVM upgrade (typically this is all Landcruisers 2018 and earlier) - which means that by default their GCM does increase.
For more detail on this please call us.

I have driven an upgraded vehicle around for years, why do I need to have the paperwork done now?

Many people have done just this - bought a 4WD, upgraded the springs and shocks and loaded it up for touring/towing. Some vehicles have been overloaded for years. The reason it's important to consider compliance is 3 fold:

  1. Legality: It is illegal to drive a vehicle in the Northern Territory if it is overloaded. The fine is $2600. I don't know about you, but this would ruin my holiday...

  2. Insurability: If a vehicle is overloaded (or has excessive lift), and is involved in a crash where the vehicle is damaged or written off, and is the subject of a vehicle claim it is likely that the insurance company will investigate (especially if the value of the vehicle, contents and towed apparatus exceeds a certain value). If the investigation shows that vehicle to be in an illegal state at the time of the incident, it is likely that the insurance company will refuse to pay out.

  3. Safety: Each time a vehicle is changed from its factory settings, there is a risk that safety is negatively affected. Suspension modifications fall directy into this category.  Checking these affects forms part of the certification and engineering assessment checks we undertake. 

All 3 of these issues can be addressed with a simple, inspection, test and certification of your vehicle.

I am thinking of buying a repairable write off vehicle - what should I consider?

Repairable write-offs are an interesting beast. An RWO is a damaged vehicle, subject to an insurance claim where the insurer has declared that it will cost them more to repair the vehicle than what it is worth. This does not mean it will cost you more to repair the vehicle than what it is worth. This status has nothing to do with the safety of the vehicle, it is simply a financial decision made by the insurer.

From a certification point of view, the main thing to consider is what will need to be repaired to make the vehicle safe to drive on the roads again. Usually this is pretty straightforward, and an inspection can be carried out to confirm the requirements.

I would like to upgrade the Braked Towing Capacity of my Vehicle - is this possible?

The short answer is no.
Only the original vehicle manufacturer can approve an increase to this value. This is due to a legislation limitation (not a result of engineering analysis on any of the vehicles), and only applies to light vehicles (< 4.5T GVM).